PARENTS GUIDE TO APPRENTICESHIPS

As a parent, you want your child to get the best possible start in their career. Why chose an apprenticeship? It is a genuine job, with training, meaning you can earn while you learn and gain a nationally recognised qualification, designed to help individuals get on the career ladder within the industry of their choice.

 

At the end of the apprenticeship, your son or daughter will gain a recognised qualification in their chosen industry, real workplace skills and great progression opportunities.

Apprenticeships have equivalent educational levels.

PARENTS GUIDE TO APPRENTICESHIPS

As a parent, you want your child to get the best possible start in their career. Why chose an apprenticeship? It is a genuine job, with training, meaning you can earn while you learn and gain a nationally recognised qualification, designed to help individuals get on the career ladder within the industry of their choice.

 

At the end of the apprenticeship, your son or daughter will gain a recognised qualification in their chosen industry, real workplace skills and great progression opportunities.

Apprenticeships have equivalent educational levels.

CV ADVICE

If this is your first time preparing your CV, we’ve prepared some tips to help you create your best CV.

What is a CV?

The letters CV stand for Curriculum Vitae. Your CV is a document you will use to apply for jobs. It’s aim is to get you an interview with the employer. In your CV, you tell the employer about your education, skills and experience, so that you can show how suitable you are for the job you are applying for.  

 

Before you start

In the job description, the employer is telling you what they are looking for in  your application. Make sure you read the job description from start to finish. Take notes and create bullet points, highlighting all of the bits you can demonstrate you’ve done and all of the bits you can't. For the bits you don’t have, where possible, include these by adapting the skills you do have. For example, if the job asks for sales experience, use examples you have from any experience you've had with the public e.g. working in shops and restaurants. It will demonstrate the skills you do have and show how they're transferable.

 

Adapt your CV for every job application

Creating your CV to meet the requirements of the job description means that if you are applying for more than one job, you will need to adapt your CV to create a different version for each job description you are responding to. This shows each employer that you are taking the job application seriously, and is how you can demonstrate you have the skills they need.

As you’re applying for your first job, employers will understand that you will not have a long work history. Don’t let this put you off – just remember to highlight the skills you have already developed and show that you’re willing to learn new ones too.

What to include in a CV?

Your CV should be no more than 2 sides of A4 and should include the following information about you:

Contact details - Include your full name, home address, mobile number and email address.

Personal Profile – Start off your CV with a short statement highlighting your key attributes,

achievements and skills. Also say why you want to work in this particular sector/job role. Try to keep this down to a short paragraph – about the size of this one!

Education - List all the places you have studied, including the dates you were at each place and the qualifications you achieved there. Place the most recent first. Include individual modules of the qualifications, where they are relevant to the vacancy you’re applying for.

Work experience - List your experience in the workplace, starting with the most recent. State the role you performed and date the start and end of each work experience period/job. Describe what you task you did, trying to make sure that where possible, your tasks were relevant to the job you're applying for. E.g. if you worked in a restaurant, have you gained good communication and customer service skills from dealing with the public?

If you have not had a paid job, this is an opportunity to explain any work placements or voluntary work you have done. Describe what you did on your placement, to provide evidence of the key skills you possess e.g. if you helped out at carnival or charity event, you might have developed timekeeping and health and safety skills.

Interests – This is where you get to provide an insight into your personality. Your interests can help show your passion for certain things and potential skills, especially if they are relevant to the job e.g. digital/computer skills if you want to work in IT, or uploading content onto the internet if you want to get into marketing. If you play in a sports team, this shows the employer that you work well in a team. Point these qualities out.

References - Think about who you would choose to provide a reference for you. References should be from someone who has employed you in the past and can vouch for your skills and experience. If you've never worked before it’s OK to use a teacher or tutor. Try to include two if you can.

You don't need to provide the names of references at this stage but might want to confirm that you can provide references upon request.

Remember:

  • Do not include any slang, or text speech

  • Make sure the font, bullets and formatting is consistent throughout

  • Check for accurate spelling and punctuation

  • Use a plain white background

  • Space your sections under separate headings so that it is easy to read

  • Adapt your CV to make it relevant, each time you send it to a different employer

  • Update your CV each time you do and/or achieve something new!

For any further help with your CV, please call us on 01332 295588.